Minimalism, Your World and You

 

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In my garden: purple verbena and yellow daisies

 

 

“What is minimalism then?…it’s living lightly and gracefully on the earth. … its uncovering who you are.” Francine Jay

 

 

I like the way that this quote points to two issues, without separating them:

1) Francine refers to ‘uncovering who we are’ which leads me to a few questions: Do I have some ‘uncovering’ to do? What are the things that I need and love? What things can I do without, and am I able to let go of these? What are my non-negotiables, the true essentials that add value to my lifestyle and to my life as a whole? What things that I own express my own true needs and preferences, and which do not?

2) She also refers to ‘Living Lightly and Gracefully on the Earth’, which for me is about living with care and consideration for the earth under our feet, and for the environment that surrounds us and gives us life. Minimalism is about living with less and implies going smaller, not bigger.

 

This quote from the wonderfully multi-skilled Peter Bevan-Baker explains further:

“Continuous expansion on a finite planet is not the answer to our challenges: Like our built environment, bigger is not necessarily better. Rather, we need better integration and a recognition of our proper place in the bigger scheme of things”

The use of the word integration reminds us of our deep connection to the world in which we live and that our actions and the choices we make, whether carefully or carelessly, have power and impact.

 

Our individual motives for Living Lightly, or becoming more Minimalist, is not really the issue here. Whether you have become tired of the clutter in your home and have started giving stuff away to a good cause, or whether your concern for our oceans means you stop using plastic drinking straws in order to help stem pollution, the result is that you are making positive change for yourself and for your environment. This is a step in the right direction towards uncovering who we are and living lightly and gracefully on the earth.

 

 

 

10 Green Tips and Tricks: part 1

 

Simple and Do-able….. 🙂

 

1. Wash out your empty glass jars (the ones you bought your pickles or olives in) and reuse: 

  • Kitchen: dry goods such as nuts and lentils, grated cheese, yoghurt etc
  • Bathroom: Salts, Scrubs and Oils (see my individual recipes…coming up in future posts)
  • Garden Shed/Garage: small nails and bolts, granular fertilisers, seed for garden birds etc

 

 

2. Can’t get the sticky label off the empty jar? Here’s what works for me:

  • Soak the empty jar in hot water, or run it through your automatic dishwasher.
  • Peel off as much of the label as possible.
  • Make a paste of baking soda (bicarb) and dish washing liquid (dish soap). Smear this over the sticky area and leave for a half hour or longer. Wipe off with a cloth.
  • If that doesn’t do the trick, smear a thick layer of peanut butter over the remaining sticky bits (it’s messy so I use the back of a spoon to do this). Leave the peanut butter to do its work for half an hour or longer.
  • Wipe off with a damp cloth or else paper towels or newspaper, and throw the paper straight into your compost bin.
  • Essential oils also well at removing adhesives. Just dab a few drops onto the corner of a dry cloth and rub the sticky spots. Try a light citrus oil such as orange or lemon. Peppermint and eucalyptus oils are other favourites to use in cleaning recipes.

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